© 2018-2019 Cooper City High School Sound Of Pride Marching Band & Color Guard

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Marching Band 

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Cooper City High School has an outstanding, award winning marching band that is rich in tradition.  It's standard of excellence and reputation as a superior arts education and performance program have led to a highly regarded presence in the community at large.

 

 

To be a member of the Cooper City Marching Band, the student must be enrolled in a band, percussion, or guard class and maintain a GPA of at least a 2.0 (“C” avg.).  No students will be allowed to participate in the marching band without being in a band class during the day.  Exceptions are made only in very rare and specific situations along with a parent/teacher/student conference.  Any student receiving more than one “F” on their report card will be sidelined and will not be able to participate until either one or both grades are brought up, regardless of GPA.  Marching band is a co-­curricular activity and those students’ participation will be reflected in their grade.

 

 

Competitive Marching Band Show, The Cowboy Show, and Alternate Status

The students in the competitive show agree to attend all summer rehearsals when the student is in town and are required to attend all band camps. Exceptions must be approved by the Band Director in advance. Each member must meet all financial obligations and must attend all rehearsals and performances (contests, football games, and parades). If a student cannot participate in football games and Saturday competitions, they cannot participate in marching band. (Please refer to the grading policy.)

 

            Those students participating in the Cowboy Show who are under alternate status will rehearse and perform with the marching band during the “Cowboy” halftime show and possibly earn a permanent spot in the competitive show at any time when deemed appropriate by the director.  The students with an alternate status will perform the competitive show standing on the sideline next to the front ensemble until they gain a permanent spot in the competitive show.  Alternates are considered full-fledged members of the Marching Band.  Alternates are expected to attend all rehearsals as per the rehearsal policy. 

                       

            Alternates may be rotated in and out on a per performance basis in order to provide the opportunity for more students to perform. Alternates will travel on all trips with the Marching Band. Alternate status is determined by the director based on musical and marching ability as well as attendance.

Physical Requirements of Marching Band

Due to the very nature of the marching band, students must be conscious of their personal fitness and general health condition.  During a marching band rehearsal or performance the heart rate increases significantly due to marching at various tempos, while playing an instrument or performing on other equipment at the same time.  Your diet should be balanced and your caffeine intake kept to a minimum.  Avoid excessive dairy products prior to long periods of sun exposure, and keep yourself well hydrated during these times.

 

            In order to increase your breathing capacity, band members will run/walk in timed exercises beginning with small time increments and gradually increasing.  They will also learn proper stretching techniques to help avoid muscle injury, and will be asked to do various exercises (including pushups or abdominal crunches) to further their conditioning.

 

            Upper and lower body strength, breathing capacity, and general coordination, as well as your general overall health should improve as our season develops.

 

            Students with limited physical strength or other physical considerations will be asked to improve their sense of physical wellbeing through alternate means. 

What's the hardest part about being a drum major?

"That's a hard question, it's a great job but a lot of pressure.  You always want to do the best for the band but you often end up looking like the bad guy.  Most people don't realize how hard it is and that you're just doing it for the band, you're not trying to be mean.  Also, you are given a lot of responsibility and you have to be prepared for anything. You never know what's going to happen, sometimes you might be afraid and not know what to do on the spot but you can't let that show, you always have to be confident and prepared for anything."

-- Katie Schmidbauer, drum major 2004-2005